Author: littlindia

What does a cavity/filling look like?

What does a cavity/filling look like?

Cavities can form on any surface of a tooth. They are most common in the nooks and crannies of the biting surface and between teeth (where floss is rarely seen…). The areas between and below your teeth need to be evaluated with an x-ray so we take radiographs every year to every few years (depending on your risk of getting cavities) to make sure that you don’t have cavities starting between your teeth, under existing fillings, or any infections brewing at the root.

This photo shows you what a cavity looks like when the tooth is first accessed, the cavity cleaned out, and then the final filling in composite (tooth-colored filling) which is color matched to the existing tooth color. Unfortunately if the fillings aren’t kept very clean (yes, flossing comes into play…) chances of getting a cavity are higher since filling margins tend to attract and hold plaque and bacteria.

The green stretchy material you see around the teeth is called a rubber dam. It holds the oral fluids away from the materials used for the filling to ensure that there is limited moisture contamination when placing the filling. Not everybody uses them but I like to keep the materials I’m using from being ingested by my patients, a stronger filling, and less chance of leakage between the filling and tooth structure.

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Apple Pie with Oat Streusel Topping

For most people, Thanksgiving’s centerpiece is the turkey. For me, it’s dessert. I love my mother in law’s apple pies so much that I save 3/4 of my plate for dessert and call dibs on the leftovers. She shared this recipe with me and I am so excited to share it with you. The original recipe is here but after reading reviews and some other tips/tricks, I’ve edited it to include all the suggestions that I found helpful. I make the pie crust the night before since most well-rated recipes call for letting the dough chill overnight to ensure a flaky and tender base. There are a lot of debates about which type of baking dish is best: glass vs. metal. I like the glass since you can see the color of the crust to ensure that it’s cooked all the way through.

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Butter Pie Crust Recipe

This is my mother-in-law’s go to recipe for pie crust. The original recipe is here. The most frequent comments that I’ve seen on homemade pie crusts include the importance of cold ingredients/tools and not working the dough too much. Using a small measured amount of ice cold water so the dough just sticks together ensures that your crust won’t be too tough or too crumbly. Once the dough is made you’ll want to refrigerate it for 2 hours up to overnight to ‘relax the gluten’ and re-solidify the fats in the dough so it says in a flaky state and will help prevent shrinking as it bakes. I have a hard time eye-balling 9″ diameter so I just turn the pie plate over to trace the outline on some wax paper so I know when I’ve reached the appropriate diameter and then go 2″ outside of the line to ensure I can have enough height for a 1/2″ crimp on the crust.  (more…)

Spinach and Kale Thepla (Gujarati-Style Flatbread)

My husband had a cold so of course my mom had 15 Indian herbal remedies to make for him to ensure a speedy recovery (my personal favorite is ginger, lemon, and honey tea). One of these suggestions was buying as many leafy greens as possible and throwing them in a blender with tons of ginger and garlic so I thought I’d try it out. ‘Thepla’ is pronounced just as it sounds and can be eaten alone, with some plain yogurt, or used as a bread.  (more…)

Za’atar Roasted Potato Wedges

I love the flavors of the Middle East and found this recipe on Maureen Abood’s website. Oven baked potato wedges are delicious but sometimes they don’t have that crispy salty exterior that I crave. The method used in this recipe is fantastic and gives you that fluffy interior and crispy exterior that really hits the spot. The za’atar spice that I have is a delicious blend of thyme, sumac, roasted sesame seeds, marjoram, oregano and salt. Some za’atar spices don’t include salt so the amount of salt you use to season may vary. Next time I make these I’m going to sprinkle some more sumac on top to add some color and a little tang.


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Chocolate Macarons

This recipe from the Joy of Baking has a really great tutorial on how to make these delicate treats. Stephanie Jaworski is an excellent teacher and graciously allowed me to post her recipe here. I have only tried a few flavors of French Macarons and always find them too sweet. I like this recipe because I think it creates the perfect balance of bittersweet chocolate ganache between lightly flavored cookies. The texture is spot on after 1-2 days refrigerated and then thawed to room temperature before eating. You should have a slight crunch on the outer shell followed by a chewy consistency and then the creamy center… yummm.


 

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Black Bean and Sweet Potato Quinoa Breakfast Skillet

This is a really scrumptious protein-packed breakfast for two that my husband always looks forward to. The ooey gooey goodness of a runny yolk makes a rich sauce but it’s all good on its own also. It would probably taste even better with a tomato relish, but I haven’t found one I quite like yet.


 

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Shredded Mexican Chicken for Enchiladas

This is my go-to chicken recipe for quesadillas/enchiladas. The original recipe is from here but my husband likes a little more spice to it so I edited it accordingly. Although I’ve never tasted it, I’ve had some true Texans say that they really enjoyed the flavor – so I am trusting them.  🙂


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Black Bean, Kale and Corn Enchiladas with Fresh Corn Salsa

Whenever I make enchiladas I try to make some with shredded chicken so that my husband isn’t forced to eat vegetarian 100% of the time. I like the spicy black beans and pinto beans (yay for protein!) countering the sweet bursts of corn. Leftovers work well for tacos / fajitas. This recipe serves 8-10 people.


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